Alan Bartlett

 

ALAN BARTLETT

Published by  on April 26, 2011 | Leave a response | Edit

INTERVIEW WITH ALAN BARTLETT

alan_bartlett

Alan Bartlett

Q.  Billy.  How old were you when you began playing tennis?

A.  Alan.  12 years old

Q.  Who influenced and contributed to your love for tennis at an early age?

A.  Two people: First my brother Roy Bartlett II, who was five years older than I.  Roy was an excellent player at Tulane.  Also my cousin Earl “Speedy” Bartlett JR, who was an excellent player at Tulane at the same time.  In fact one year when they were playing at Tulane, Roy and his partner, Lou Schopfer #2 defeated Earl and Billy McGhee #1 for the SEC Doubles Championship.

Q.  Where did you play growing up?

A.  I grew up on the courts on South Saratoga Street, which was the site of the New Orleans Lawn and Tennis Club.  Then played in high school at Fortier, which was an all boys’public high school.  While a student at Fortier my partner, Glenn Gardener, and I won the state doubles championship.  Later, I received a tennis scholarship at Tulane.

Pictured are the members of the Tulane varsity tennis team. They are from left to right: Billy Conery, Alan Bartlett, Jack Tuero, Richard Mouledous, Leslie Longshore, Harcourt Waters, and Wade Herrin.

Pictured are the members of the Tulane varsity tennis team. They are from left to right: Billy Conery, Alan Bartlett, Jack Tuero, Richard Mouledous, Leslie Longshore, Harcourt Waters, and Wade Herrin.

Q.  Who were the best male players you saw play in person.

A.  In doubles, it would be Gardnar Mulloy and Billy Talbert(both International Tennis Hall of Fame members).  In singles it would be Roger Federer and Pancho Segura. I saw Mulloy, Talbert and Segura play in the Sugar Bowl Tennis Tournament on the courts at the New Orleans Country Club.

Q.  Name a “teaching pro “ who influenced the growth of tennis in the New Orleans area?

A.  Jimmy Bateman.  He rented an apartment near the South Saratoga courts, and trained and taught many young players.  He was the one who discovered NCAA Champion Jack Tuero, who was from Memphis.

Q.  When family or friends are visiting from out of town, were do you take them out to eat?

A.  Commander’s, Upperline, Galatoire’s, and Bozo’s

Q.  Where do you worship?

A.  Rayne Memorial Methodist Church

Q.  Profession?

A.  Realtor.  R. Alan Bartlett Inc. since 1967

Q.  Interests other than tennis?

A.  My family; our three daughter’s families, and our eight grandchildren.  My wife Jackie and our three daughters have played tennis tournaments throughout the State.  Also enjoy traveling, art, and the SAINTS.

Q.  What is your impression of the new City Park Pepsi Tennis Center?

A.  Wonderful! Great facility

Q.  What has the game of tennis meant to you?

A.  Tennis has had a tremendous influence on my life.  I have met and made many friends through tennis.  When I was 14 years old, my parents put me on a bus with my doubles partner, Billy Conery.  We were great friends, and we traveled the South playing tournaments.  We were nationally ranked.  Later, Jackie my wife and I, with good friends Lester and Gloria Kabscoff, became friends with eight tennis -playing couples from Mexico.  We called ourselves the “Mestre Family.” Over the years we alternated between the United States and Mexico, playing matches in different cities.  Great fun.  Of course, the winners won the “Mestre Cup.” There have been so many friends I could not mention them all from all around the country.

Q.  Have you competed in any USTA tournaments?

A.  Numerous years I won State Championships in my age group, both in singles and doubles. Also, I won numerous local, state and regional tournaments in singles and doubles.  My doubles partners were my brother Roy and Israel “Del” Delgado, a City Park Club member. Also, I won the USTA Senior “55’s” Southern Indoor Title in singles, which was held at the Hilton Riverside Club facility in New Orleans.

Q.  What was the brand of your first racquet?

A.  Wilson Kramer

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